What is an Aggravated DUI?

If you’ve ever heard of someone getting a DUI, or experienced it yourself, you likely know the penalties for drinking and driving can be very tough. Why? Drinking and driving is one of the leading causes for death in the United States, and is involved in a high number of driving related deaths in U.S. every year.

It’s important not to drink and drive at all. Every state has the blood alcohol content (BAC) level at 0.08 percent, so never drive after drinking even if you feel fine. Drinking anything and driving not only increases of getting a DUI arrest, but also getting into an accident.

One of the stiffest penalties involved in drinking and driving is the aggravated DUI.

What is an aggravated DUI?
An aggravated DUI is different for different states, and not all states use it, instead using other terms or simply making DUI penalties as misdemeanors and felonies. For our purposes, let’s consider that most states consider an aggravated DUI to be from: repeat drinking and driving violations in a short time period, an accident occurring¬† while driving intoxicated, and other problems which may come to be after drinking and driving.

If someone gets hurt–if you hit someone while drinking and driving–it can be considered a major crime and an aggravated DUI. This happens more often than you might think, as thousands of deaths every year are related to an aggravated DUI. If you’ve been drinking, decide to drive later at night, and hit someone walking and hurt or kill them, you can expect felony charges.

Defining Aggravated DUI in More Detail

Let’s define situations in more detail where you might get an aggravated DUI.

-Multiple convictions over a period of years
-Driving on a suspended license
-Driving with a minor
-Injury or death occurs
-No valid insurance
-Driving in school zone

So let’s explain those penalties. They vary from state to state, and not all states using aggravated DUI have the same charges. In most states, you can expect an aggravated DUI for multiple convictions in a short period. If you’ve had three DUI convictions in one year, you can expect felony charges. If you’re driving without a license, it can be considered an aggravated DUI. If you drive your kids while drunk, it will heavy punishment including an aggravated DUI; or if you drive a school bus while dunk, you can face punishments including aggravated DUI.

Only a few states do not punish drivers with aggravated DUI penalties. This may change soon.

What do you do after an aggravated DUI?
Hiring a good DUI lawyer is your first step. You need someone to help you, as the penalties can be extended jail time, permanent license suspension, and very large fines. It depends on what exactly you did. But if it involves a death, you cannot go without a DUI lawyer. This could mean a very long sentence in prison. The important thing is to not get into this situation.  Avoid drinking and driving because it puts others in danger.

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